Comments (8)
  1. I’ve been trying to get a copy of Tenth of December through my library and it’s been “status-pending” for like a month. Very frustrating.

    Saunders is fabu.

  2. I just read an essay by Saunders about Barthelme’s “The School”. It was so excellent. I lack the ability to articulate how much I love Barthelme’s writing, so from now on I’m just going to use this essay instead:

    http://paulsaxton.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/saunders-barthelme-a.pdf

  3. In other Bookgum-ish news, I just (as in 2 minutes ago) finished DFW’s Oblivion. Woof. (That’s a positive woof, as in, “Woof, that was SOMETHING. How does he do it?”)

    • Oblivion has made it kind of impossible for me to read the Pale King. Yes, absolutely, how does he do it, but at the same time…

      There’s can be a temptation, when you learn more (say, a LOT more) about an author’s life, to just try to map his/her life onto the fiction. Of course in many cases, that’s a load of bollocks, but in the case of Oblivion, the urge to succumb to that temptation is for me, quite strong.

      So if one does, the stories seem to tell me something about what DFW must have been dealing with through most of his adult life. And not just “Good Old Neon”- while Oblivion is, overall, a masterful collection of stories, it’s also potentially a window into the life of a very sad man, and it’s kept The Pale King on the shelf, just staring at me.

      • I totally relate. I wish I had a chance to read him when he was living so I didn’t have to feel guilty about conducting/trying not to conduct a post mortem every time I read him now.

        That being said, The Pale King is pretty great for aspiring writer-ish types (me) on the merits of its sentence construction alone.

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